#RIP Heroes

So, happy new year everyone!  What a way to start.  The funeral of Motorhead’s Lemmy took place yesterday and David Bowie died.

I can’t quite believe I just wrote that.

DAVID BOWIE DIED.

“Don’t be too sad.” said my kid, shutting the car door.

“Don’t worry, I won’t.” I said, and returned from the school run this morning with tears rolling down my face, snot pouring from my nose, the roads, flooded by the rain.

I’m still leaking now, as I write.  I can’t bear to play the radio because it’s all Bowie stuff and I will only make this post short as I will probably short circuit my laptop if any more water gets in between the keys.

MCDHUNG EC009

THE HUNGER, David Bowie, 1983, (c) MGM/courtesy Everett Collection

I am so pleased to have grown up in my teens listening to and watching David Bowie.  He influenced my love for music.  I was fascinated by his ever-changing style and my friends and I were besotted by his screen performance in The Hunger, a film that we would watch over and over again, never tiring of his soft voice and exquisite looks.  Probably one of my most guilty Bowie pleasures was The Laughing Gnome, that my friend and I used to listen to back at her house on a school lunch break, and we would wonder, why did he do that one?  But it had us in stitches every time.

Lemmy’s passing, now that was a sad day too, but one that I had seen coming having read reports of ill health during 2014/15.  It is, however, a sign of time moving along, little bits of our present that, beyond our control are now past and I feel a little panic at this.

I saw Motorhead play a few times, loud and fast.  Too loud.  Very fast.  The last time I saw Lemmy in the flesh was at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods Awards in 2013 when he received the Golden Gods award from Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver, and Loaded bassist Duff McKagan.  I and all Lemmy’s fans can be comforted now knowing that they will be seeing him again soon in the forthcoming rock and roll movie (the loudest silent movie on earth) Gutterdammerung, due to be released at events this year.

lemmy

Thank you Bowie for giving me a love for music and creativity.

Thank you Lemmy for giving me tinnitus, I will cherish it forever 🙂

Long Live The Fans

xxx

Advertisements

6 responses to “#RIP Heroes

  • JunkChuck

    Reblogged this on Old Road Apples and commented:
    For this very special Tunesday, in the wake of the loss of David Bowie, I’ll be reposting the eulogistic tributes from other WordPress writers.

  • JunkChuck

    I remember when all sorts of people were crying and wailing and waxing nostalgic after the death of Michael Jackson. It’s like that, but a thousand times more. Bowie transcended generational boundaries, genres, stereotypes, even music itself. In my memory, only the loss of John Lennon compares, and even then I was 13 years old and liked Bowie way more than I ever liked the Beatles.

    • annaghislena

      Thank you for reading and re-blogging my piece. It means a lot. Yes, I could not stop my tears falling on Monday. The only similar circumstance that left me feeling this bereft was upon the death of Freddie Mercury, I cried at work all day then. Bowie meant more to me than I realised; teenage dreams, a sense of sophistication with a dash of non-conformity thrown in and music and song writing that is embedded in my heart. My only regret is that I never saw him play live – I can’t believe how that happened. Thanks again for re-blogging. Anna x

  • dbp49

    I think it speaks volumes that even though I grew up listening to both of these talents, so did my nephew who just turned 20. They were both ageless, and both will be missed.

    • annaghislena

      Thanks for reading my piece. My kids also listen to them, especially Bowie. They may not have found him so soon without me popping a CD or two into the car radio for a long journey, but they adored the lyrics that just didn’t seem to mean anything and even made up their own to fit the music. Ie on ‘Changes’ “Chow mein changed me, but you can taste Thai.” They now pick out the melodies to songs on the piano too. A legacy of brilliant song writing left to us all and immortal in that sense. Anna x

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: